Book Review: Long Bright River by Liz Moore

Book Review: Long Bright River by Liz Moore (2020) 5 Star *****

This is one of those books that will stay with you for the rest of your life. A police procedural and depressing family saga rolled into a compelling story of love, neglect, abandonment, betrayal, drug addiction, hopelessness, personal weakness, suspicions, and lack of trust, leads us to our main character, Philadelphia Police Officer Michaela (Mickey) Fitzpatrick, emotionally bereft, overwhelmed by responsibility and fears, grappling to find a safe place to call home for herself and her young son. Having virtually never felt reciprocal love while growing up, Mickey finds it difficult to maintain relationships. Mickey and her drug addicted sister were raised by their cold, aloof, hyper-critical, neglectful grandmother after the drug death of their mother and abandonment by their father. Always hungry and cold, inappropriately dressed and most often left to fend for themselves, these sisters struggle through life in what becomes a tug-of-war between adherence to rules and laws and the mean streets of drug ravaged Northeast Philadelphia. Unfortunately, both girls become victims to the predators of the community and streets. Often trusting the wrong people and dismissing the right ones, it’s hard to identify the wolves in sheep’s clothing.

Mickey becomes obsessed by the search for her missing sister. Is she the latest, but maybe yet not found, victim of a serial killer targeting drug-addicted young girls of the street?  Her attempts to solve these crimes and capture the perp, lead Mickey down a path of police cover-up, suspicious behavior, and mistrust of commanding officers, as well as those she once considered friends. This lack of trust irreparably damages Mickey’s relationships. The community does not know what to believe. As these things go, the top brass turns the tables on Mickey so that she is now under investigation by Internal Affairs.

The book is well-written with simple sentences and language, with chapters alternating between past and present. Instead of using quotation marks ( ” ” ) around dialogue, the author uses a dash ( – ) before each line where the character speaks, but does not use punctuation to separate ideas within these lines. It’s a simple technique for the author, but perhaps confusing for the reader.

The author makes a point to show how there is often honor among the down-and-out population of the streets. They can be believed. They know the truth, but can be reluctant to express it for fear of personal safety. Many desperately want to stop their downward spiral, but the pull of the drugs and the pain of withdrawal require great strength with a strong and constant support system. Many of the victims of the street lost the love and encouragement of their family and friends years ago.

Significance of title: The long bright river is where the spirits of these victims of the street congregate en masse with bright shining faces begging not to be forgotten.

Happy ending? Many misconceptions, hidden agendas, lies, and manipulations come to light. Relationships are examined, but not trusted. Truth is revealed, but not accepted. Explanations are given, but not believed. The truth is when kids are emotionally abused, they grow up hating themselves, not their abusers. We cannot shed the negative messages of our childhood. They rear their ugly heads when we least expect it—always the reminder of what we fear is the real us that we try to keep hidden from the world.

Things are resolved, but no happy ending here.

 

Please let me know your thoughts. I’d love to hear from you. You can email me at elainewrites@earthlink.net

I wish you all a life inspired by the wonder of the world around us. May you find and live your truth, in harmony with people, nature and the environment. May you be a force for good and a source of love and comfort. May the world be a better place for you having lived and loved here.

All rights reserved 2020

 

Book Review: Long Bright River by Liz Moore

Book Review: Long Bright River by Liz Moore (2020) 5 Star *****

This is one of those books that will stay with you for the rest of your life. A police procedural and depressing family saga rolled into a compelling story of love, neglect, abandonment, betrayal, drug addiction, hopelessness, personal weakness, suspicions, and lack of trust, leads us to our main character, Philadelphia Police Officer Michaela (Mickey) Fitzpatrick, emotionally bereft, overwhelmed by responsibility and fears, grappling to find a safe place to call home for herself and her young son. Having virtually never felt reciprocal love while growing up, Mickey finds it difficult to maintain relationships. Mickey and her drug addicted sister were raised by their cold, aloof, hyper-critical, neglectful grandmother after the drug death of their mother and abandonment by their father. Always hungry and cold, inappropriately dressed and most often left to fend for themselves, these sisters struggle through life in what becomes a tug-of-war between adherence to rules and laws and the mean streets of drug ravaged Northeast Philadelphia. Unfortunately, both girls become victims to the predators of the community and streets. Often trusting the wrong people and dismissing the right ones, it’s hard to identify the wolves in sheep’s clothing.

Mickey becomes obsessed by the search for her missing sister. Is she the latest, but maybe yet not found, victim of a serial killer targeting drug-addicted young girls of the street?  Her attempts to solve these crimes and capture the perp, lead Mickey down a path of police cover-up, suspicious behavior, and mistrust of commanding officers, as well as those she once considered friends. This lack of trust irreparably damages Mickey’s relationships. The community does not know what to believe. As these things go, the top brass turns the tables on Mickey so that she is now under investigation by Internal Affairs.

The book is well-written with simple sentences and language, with chapters alternating between past and present. Instead of using quotation marks ( ” ” ) around dialogue, the author uses a dash ( – ) before each line where the character speaks, but does not use punctuation to separate ideas within these lines. It’s a simple technique for the author, but perhaps confusing for the reader.

The author makes a point to show how there is often honor among the down-and-out population of the streets. They can be believed. They know the truth, but can be reluctant to express it for fear of personal safety. Many desperately want to stop their downward spiral, but the pull of the drugs and the pain of withdrawal require great strength with a strong and constant support system. Many of the victims of the street lost the love and encouragement of their family and friends years ago.

Significance of title: The long bright river is where the spirits of these victims of the street congregate en masse with bright shining faces begging not to be forgotten.

Happy ending? Many misconceptions, hidden agendas, lies, and manipulations come to light. Relationships are examined, but not trusted. Truth is revealed, but not accepted. Explanations are given, but not believed. The truth is when kids are emotionally abused, they grow up hating themselves, not their abusers. We cannot shed the negative messages of our childhood. They rear their ugly heads when we least expect it—always the reminder of what we fear is the real us that we try to keep hidden from the world.

Things are resolved, but no happy ending here.

 

Please let me know your thoughts. I’d love to hear from you. You can email me at elainewrites@earthlink.net

I wish you all a life inspired by the wonder of the world around us. May you find and live your truth, in harmony with people, nature and the environment. May you be a force for good and a source of love and comfort. May the world be a better place for you having lived and loved here.

All rights reserved 2020

 

Book Review: The Science of Breakable Things by Tae Keller (MG)

Book Review: The Science of Breakable Things by Tae Keller (2018) (MG) 4 Stars ****

Seventh-grader Natalie Napoli becomes immersed in her science class assignments given by her very cool teacher Mr. Neely. His enthusiasm for all things science spills over to Natalie and her classmates. This happens as Natalie’s life is slowly unraveling.

Natalie’s botanist mother is suddenly depressed and emotionally, mentally, and physically unavailable as she now spends most of her days in bed in her pajamas. Natalie’s therapist father gives his wife space and encourages Natalie to do the same, while he no longer initiates family activities with his daughter. Natalie’s friendship with her once best friend Mikayla Menzer has eroded. Now, Natalie believes that Mikayla’s mother, whom Natalie once adored, is the cause of her mother’s depression. Natalie thinks Mrs. Menzer, who was her mother’s boss, fired her mother from her job at the lab, leaving her mother unglued.

Joined by her new friends and teammates Dari and Twig, Natalie is determined to enter and win the City-Wide Egg Drop Contest. Grand Prize: $500! This money will allow her to pay for a trip to New Mexico to recover a Cobalt Blue Orchid Natalie believes will instantly snap her mother out of the doldrums and put their lives back on track. Unfortunately, Natalie’s team does not win the contest. Natalie concocts a scheme to pilfer some seeds from the lab where her mother worked. Her loyal teammates accompany Natalie on this middle-of-the night-caper. Awakened by the security alarm, the sleeping guard investigates, then calls Mrs. Menzer, who in turn calls each set of parents before dropping off the three culprits at their respective homes.

Natalie learns the truth of her mother’s situation. Natalie’s mother kept a lot from her and ends up in therapy twice a week to rid herself of her demons. The family dynamics are restored and all are happy in the end. “As it turns out, you can’t always protect breakable things. Hearts and eggs will break, and everything changes, but you keep going anyway. Because science is asking questions. and living is not being afraid of the answer.”

This book is cleverly presented with visual and graphic aids. Assignments are science investigative questions on looseleaf paper. Hashtags address the students. Illustrative and labeled sketches reinforce the story line and serve as a teaching/learning tools.

Some things are not addressed in the book. The reasons for Natalie’s mother’s depression are not given, except to say it also happened when Natalie was a baby. Also, Natalie’s father is half Korean (maternal side) and half Italian (paternal side) but totally ignores and negates his Korean heritage without explanation. Let’s not forget that Natalie sneaks into her parents’ bedroom while they are sleeping, rummaging for keys, but no one wakes up. Despite the whispered conversation outside the parents’ bedroom door between Natalie and Twig (who has used the key hidden in the fake rock to enter Natalie’s house) and the downstairs conversation with Dari (who has also shown up to accompany Natalie on her seed quest), the parents don’t stir. So coincidental. Twig and Dari happen to show up just as Natalie is ready to leave. Hmmm.

The moral of this story? Don’t make assumptions. Almost everything Natalie believe to be true, isn’t. Also, kids are not responsible for fixing their parents. Outside help is needed because the solutions are beyond the powers of a child.

 

Please let me know your thoughts. I’d love to hear from you. You can email me at author@elainedonadio.com.

I wish you all a life inspired by the wonder of the world around us. May you find and live your truth, in harmony with people, nature and the environment. May you be a force for good and a source of love and comfort. May the world be a better place for you having lived and loved here.

All rights reserved 2019

Book Review: Raymie Nightingale by Kate DiCamillo

Book Review: Raymie Nightingale by Kate DiCamillo (2016)  (MG) 4 Stars ****( Middle Grade Book)

We meet our main character, ten year-old Raymie Clark, on June 5, 1975, as she attempts to take baton twirling lessons from eccentric Ms. Ida Nee. Louisiana and Beverly, also in Raymie’s group, meet each other for the first time as they all decide to make baton twirling their talent so each one can enter and win the Little Miss Central Florida Tire contest. Events conspire to prevent any actual baton twirling from taking place. Unforgiving Ms. Nee looks at any delay as an excuse to refuse to teach the girls. No one learns baton twirling, but the trio establish a much-needed supportive friendship which quite literally saves lives.

Initial impressions are dispelled as the girls slowly reveal the truth about their situations. Sunny Raymie, living with her kind, responsible mother, is heartbroken since her insurance agency owner father ran away on June 3 with the town dental hygienist without saying good-bye. Fragile Louisiana, prone to fainting spells, is being raised by her eccentric grandmother since the supposed death of her flying trapeze act parents in a drowning accident. Feisty Beverly lives with an alcoholic, physically abusive mother since her father left Florida to become a cop in New York City. The girls are desperate for loving attention, answers, and support. They give it to each other as they also receive it from responsive adults in the community.

At first, competitors for the crown, the girls judge Louisiana to be the most needy and deserving of the $1,975 prize money and encourage her to use her beautiful singing voice as her talent. The Three Rancheros, as Louisiana names the group, support Raymie through the death of a beloved neighbor, save a pitiful howling dog from the dog shelter, and help Raymie retrieve her book about Florence Nightingale from the senior nursing home. Beverly, always the independent, unconventional voice of reason, picks locks to illegally enter premises to achieve what they set out to do.

In the end, Raymie literally saves Louisiana from certain death by drowning and is eternally grateful to her swimming instructor who taught her how to save Louisiana before he went away, and also remembered to say good-bye before he left. Raymie is now known as Raymie Nightingale. “It was the easiest thing in the world to save somebody. For the first time, she understood Florence Nightingale and her lantern and the bright and shining path. She understood why Edward Option, the librarian, had given her the book. For just a minute, she understood everything in the whole world … She was Ramie Nightingale, coming to the rescue.”

This is a simple, charming book, low key but increasingly powerful near the end. To be honest, I found it boring and uneventful in the beginning and almost stopped reading. The pace picked up and the events and characters became more complex. Reading this book is like spending a lazy day where nothing seems to happen but suddenly it does. I’m happy I continued with this sweet, emotionally satisfying story.

 

Please let me know your thoughts. I’d love to hear from you. You can email me at author@elainedonadio.com.

I wish you all a life inspired by the wonder of the world around us. May you find and live your truth, in harmony with people, nature and the environment. May you be a force for good and a source of love and comfort. May the world be a better place for you having lived and loved here.

All rights reserved 2019

Book Review: The Stars Beneath Our Feet by David Barclay Moore

Book Review: The Stars Beneath Our Feet by David Barclay Moore (MG) for reading level, (YA) for content 5 Stars *****

What a terrific book for sophisticated MG and YA readers! This book is totally modern with its Harlem slang, supportive lesbian mother, mostly absent caring father with a new girlfriend, an idolized older brother who was shot to death in a nightclub in the Bronx, gang bangers who terrorize the younger, unassociated kids, conflicted desire for a better life, friends who teeter on the edge between right and wrong, friendship with an autistic girl which started out as dislike, rivalry, then evolved into a healthy cooperation to achieve excellence and fame, and a helpful community center counselor. This book has it all.

Twelve -year-old Wallace (Lolly) Rachpaul, who  lives in Harlem in the upper east side of Manhattan, is obsessed with keeping his possessions from being “confiscated” by the thugs who frequent 125 St. Despondent over the death of his twenty-year-old brother, Jermaine, Lolly begins to give up on life and loses interest in his school work. His only interest is constructing buildings with his individual Lego kits. When Steve, a young man who serves as a positive role model for the neighborhood boys, gives Lolly a book for Christmas entitled A Pattern of Architecture, Lolly is inspired to innovate. He combines all the Lego pieces, integrating the blocks from all the kits, with his imagination on fire. His mom’s girlfriend brings bags full of Lego pieces from her job at a toy factory. Ali, the counselor at the community center, encourages Lolly to build with his Legos and gives him a private room to construct the imaginary alien world of Harmonee. From this activity, Lolly utilizes math and creative writing. The other kids become involved and Lolly’s mutually beneficial relationship with autistic Big Rose begins. Lolly and Big Rose find a common area in which to gain public recognition.

At the end, Lolly is able to come to terms with his brother’s death, his parents’ separate lives, his loyalty in friendships that don’t always run smoothly, and his desire to excel in life and avoid the trappings of the life around him. Lolly tells us how much he has changed from the beginning of the story, “Since then I had learned the most important thing: the decisions you make can become your life. Your choices are you.”

 

Please let me know your thoughts. I’d love to hear from you. You can email me at author@elainedonadio.com.

I wish you all a life inspired by the wonder of the world around us. May you find and live your truth, in harmony with people, nature and the environment. May you be a force for good and a source of love and comfort. May the world be a better place for you having lived and loved here.

All rights reserved 2018

MG Book Review: See You in the Cosmos by Jack Cheng

MG Book Review: See You in the Cosmos by Jack Cheng -5 Stars  *****

This book is perfect for 10-12 year olds, especially those who are obsessed with communicating with outer space and/ or unfortunately, are victims of parental neglect.

What a wonderfully, surprisingly insightful book this turned out to be! The formatting is so different from a traditional book that I was not sure what to expect. The story is told in the first person point of view — without quotation marks and often in interview format—of eleven year old Alex Petroski from Rockview, Colorado who decides to travel to a site near Albuquerque, New Mexico to the SHARF rocket festival where he plans to launch his home-made rocket in competition. Before he leaves, Alex rescues an abandoned dog whom he names Carl Sagan after his role model and idol. Carl Sagan accompanies Alex on his three-day trek which gives them both a series of adventures and a purpose to clarify some loose ends and missing information. Alex uses his IPOD to keep a record of conversations and sounds to create a Golden Record which he plans on sending into outer space, similar to what the famous astronomer Carl Sagan did with Voyagers 1 and 2.

As the story unfolds, it is apparent that Alex is a neglected, unsupervised child with a heart of gold and the wisdom of a much older person. Although he is eleven, Alex likes to brag that he has the smarts of a thirteen year old and should not be judged by his age. Alex’s father is deceased, his mother is schizophrenic and missing in action most of the time—physically, mentally, and emotionally—and  his twenty-four year old brother lives and works in Los Angeles. Alex goes to great lengths to hide the fact of his abandonment.

His open, loving, and generous spirit endears him to the outside world as he travels with Carl Sagan to meet his destiny. Alex meets up with friendly, caring, adult strangers who aid him in his now three-fold quest: to attend and compete in the rocket festival in New Mexico, to verify if the man on the internet search with the same name and birthdate as his thought-to-be-deceased father is in fact his father in Las Vegas where he inadvertently discovers a half-sister, and to visit his older brother, RJ in Los Angeles whom he hasn’t seen in over one year.  Alex and Carl Sagan both experience setbacks as Carl Sagan is hopelessly lost in Las Vegas and Alex is severely injured in Colorado. Thankfully, the adults in Alex’s world step up to the plate bringing this heart-wrenching story to a satisfactory ending as they learn to take responsibility for the consequences of their actions—all except for Mom who is an extreme case requiring long-term treatment, which may or may not work.

Wow! What an emotional roller coaster!

Lesson Ideas—
* Study the cosmos, interplanetary communication, principles of rocket science, Carl Sagan
* Calculate distances from location to location according to different methods of transportation

Please let me know your thoughts. I’d love to hear from you. You can email me at author@elainedonadio.com.

I wish you all a life inspired by the wonder of the world around us. May you find and live your truth, in harmony with people, nature and the environment. May you be a force for good and a source of love and comfort. May the world be a better place for you having lived and loved here.

All rights reserved 2018

Study Guide 5- The Ocean’s Way by Elaine Donadio

Chapters 14-18.

Please see my Nov. 2, 2017 blog post for the updated study guide schedule.

You can preview and purchase The Ocean’s Way at Amazon or Barnes & Noble websites for a digital or paperback copy, or you can visit Smashwords.com for a digital copy.

This is the last study guide for this book. You might want to purchase Who Do Voodoo? to be ready for our next focus book for January.

Holly and Jasmine have experienced many changes. Holly in particular is deeply affected by what she has learned about dolphins and pilot whales giving her a new understanding of how each person can contribute to the balance of nature and the preservation of the environment.

 

These questions are based on Chapters 14-18.

 

1. List at least five facts you learned about manatees. What has the state of Florida done to insure their safety?

2. List at least five facts you have learned about pilot whales. In what ways are pilot whales like humans? In what ways are they different? What is it about pilot whales that make them so vulnerable? What other creatures can you think of whose behaviors could lead to their own downfall?

3. How are donations used to help rescued sea creatures in Florida? Why do you think the government and people of Florida attach so much importance to maintaining the safety of the wildlife in their state?

4. Design a fundraising campaign in your school and/ or community to help raise money to help in the rescue of stranded sea creatures. Decide how to raise the money. Create a poster. Research marine rescue organizations. Choose one to be the recipient of your monetary gift. You do not actually have to put this plan in practice, but please do the plan either way.

Which creatures need rescuing where you live? What could you do to help?

5. Take a look at Holly’s poem about the ocean on the last two pages of Chapter 18. Explain Holly’s fascination with the ocean. Design a T-shirt to capture Holly’s message using a slogan, images, and words to attract attention.

6. Holly and Jasmine have both changed from the beginning, middle, and end of the book. How has each one changed? What influenced these changes? Do you believe these changes are temporary or permanent? Support your answer.

If you had to choose one thing to change about yourself, what would it be? Make a decision now to accomplish this goal. Research. Analyze. Plan. Do.

 

Spoiler alert: I will not be providing the answers for the questions. If you’re a serious adventurer, then you will discover the world on your own. Support all your answers with facts found in the book or outside resources. Seek and you shall find!

Next: Who Do Voodoo? Study Guide 1. See you on Dec. 30, 2017!

You can email Elaine Donadio at author @elainedonadio.com

All rights reserved 2017.

Study Guide 4- The Ocean’s Way by Elaine Donadio

Chapters 10-13.

Please see my Nov. 2, 2017 blog post for the updated study guide schedule.

You can preview and purchase The Ocean’s Way at Amazon or Barnes & Noble websites for a digital or paperback copy, or you can visit Smashwords.com for a digital copy.

Holly and Jasmine visit marine parks and are treated like special guests. They learn a lot about dolphins, alligators, wetlands, ecosystems, the environment, and the balance of nature.

 

These questions are based on Chapters 10-13.

1. Go to the fourth page of Chapter 10. Answer the ten questions about dolphins. Include answers from Chapters 10 and 11, the Internet, and any source books you may have. Check your answers on the sixth page of Chapter 10.

2. Make a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast dolphins and alligators. If you had to live your life as one of these creatures, which one would you choose? Why?

3. What are wetlands? We learn that alligators are apex predators. Describe the food chain among the creatures of the Florida swamps.

4. What would happen if the Florida wetlands were destroyed? Explain the effects on the environment and ecosystems. How would the world be affected if alligators became extinct? How would the world be affected if dolphins and pilot whales became extinct?

5. Choose a creature living in the South Florida swamps. Research facts and list them. Using these facts, create a Tanka poem to tell about your creature. Use the Tanka poem about the swamp in Chapter 13 as a model. See the formula below.

Tanka Poem – 5 lines

Line 1  – 5 syllables
Line 2  – 7 syllables
Line 3  – 5 syllables
Line 4  – 7 syllables
Line 5  –  7 syllables

 

Spoiler alert: I will not be providing the answers for the questions. If you’re a serious adventurer, then you will discover the world on your own. Support all your answers with facts found in the book or your own research. Seek and you shall find!

All rights reserved 2017.

You can email Elaine Donadio at author@elainedonadio.com

Next: The Ocean’s Way Study Guide 5. See you on Dec. 31, 2017!

Study Guide 2- The Ocean’s Way by Elaine Donadio

Chapters 4-6.

Please see my Nov. 2, 2017 blog post for the updated study guide schedule.

You can preview and purchase The Ocean’s Way at Amazon or Barnes & Noble websites for a digital or paperback copy, or you can visit Smashwords.com for a digital copy.

Holly and Jasmine both share many personal details of their lives. Holly is surprised to discover how much pain her best friend is feeling. When it looks as if all hope is lost, the adults in the story step up to the plate.

These questions are based on Chapters 4-6.

 

1. Discuss how Jasmine’s self-image might be influenced by her situation at home. How might this affect her interaction with others?

2. Pretend you are a case worker from Child Protective Services. Create five interview questions for Jasmine’s mother and have Jasmine’s mother answer them as you believe she would. Use details from the story.

3. Describe Grandma Rosie’s personality. The girls seem to believe things will turn out fine now that Grandma Rosie is on the scene. Do you agree or disagree with their conclusion? Base your answer on what has happened in the story.

4. Now that we’ve met Grandma Rosie, you can well imagine the conversation she will have with her son-in-law Albert about what’s going on in his home. Write a dialogue tracking the discussion.

Grandma Rosie:
Albert:
Grandma Rosie:
Albert:
Grandma Rosie:
Albert:

Keep the conversation going…

5. Pretend you are Jasmine. Write an email message to your father telling him how you feel about his absence and return. Use facts from the story.

 

Spoiler alert: I will not be providing the answers for the questions. If you’re a serious adventurer, then you will discover the world on your own. Support all your answers with facts found in the book. Seek and you shall find!

You can email Elaine Donadio at author@elainedonadio.com

Next: The Ocean’s Way Study Guide 3. See you on Dec. 16, 2017!

All rights reserved 2017.

Study Guide 1- The Ocean’s Way by Elaine Donadio

Chapters 1-3.

Please see my Nov. 2, 2017 blog post for the updated study guide schedule.

You can preview and purchase The Ocean’s Way at Amazon or Barnes & Noble websites for a digital or paperback copy, or you can visit Smashwords.com for a digital copy.

We meet our main character, Holly Christiano and her best friend, Jasmine Jankowski. Holly is thrilled to be going to study marine life in South Florida, but Jasmine is putting up barriers. We learn about the girls’ lives and the problems and disappointments they face.

 

These questions are for Chapters 1-3.

 

1. Make a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast Holly and Jasmine. Choose which one you would rather have as a friend. Explain.

2. Sometimes we can learn about a character’s strength by how they react to situations in their lives. Describe how Holly and Jasmine have each deal with heartache. Pretend you are a school guidance counselor, what advice would you give them to make their lives happier?

3. Which character can you most identify with? Pretend you are that character. Write an entry in your diary explaining what’s on your mind.

Using the crossword puzzle model in Chapter 1, create your own crossword puzzle using five words and a thesaurus to describe how you’re feeling about your life right now.

Using the diamante (diamond) format of the airplane poem in Chapter 1, create your own diamante poem to describe an important object in your life. Use the following format. Note the diamond shape. Your poem should look the same.

Diamante Poem Format

Line 1- one noun
Line 2- two adjectives
Line 3- three “ing” verbs
Line 4- a four word phrase
Line 5- three “ed” verbs
Line 6- two adjectives
Line 7- one synonym for the noun in Line 1

4. Discuss why Nestor treats Holly so differently from Jasmine. What does this tell us about Nestor? How do you deal with being treated differently from siblings, friends or classmates?

5. Predict what Holly might find when she visits Jasmine’s house. Use details from the story to support your answer.

 

Spoiler alert: I will not be providing the answers for the questions. If you’re a serious adventurer, then you will discover the world on your own. Support all your answers with facts found in the book. Seek and you shall find!

All rights reserved 2017.

You can email Elaine Donadio at author@elainedonadio.com

Next: The Ocean’s Way Study Guide 2. See you on Dec. 9, 2017!

All rights reserved 2017

Saturday, March 14, 2020- Barnes & Noble, Massapequa, NY 12:00-4:00pm

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